This is the first of some special posts dedicated to the history of spanking art.

Ancient Egypt was one of the world’s first civilizations and it is not surprising that it was also a culture in which corporal punishment was common. Imagery of that is preserved in places like Beni Hasan.

It can be assumed that if adults were subject to corporal punishment in those days, so were children in the home, at school and at work, albeit in milder forms. However, not much is known about that.

The scourge, or flail, and the crook, are the two symbols of power and domination depicted in the hands of Osiris in Egyptian monuments. They are the unchanging form of the instrument throughout the ages; though, the flail depicted in Egyptian mythology was an agricultural instrument used to thresh wheat, and not for corporal punishment.

Egypt used judicial corporal punishment and prison corporal punishment until recently. Adult men in Egyptian prisons were chastised with a whip which had a cord on a cudgel branching into seven tails, each with six knots, a variant of the cat o’ nine tails. Boys in Egyptian prisons were subject to corporal punishment too, but they were not whipped but caned. Women and girls were not subject to judicial or prison corporal punishment in modernity, only males. There was also the punishment of bastinado (beating of the soles of the feet).